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Article and Database Searching

Introduction

If you already know what article you want, you do not need to use a database to get it. The citation should include information like journal title, article title, date, volume and issue that can help you find the article you need.

Example Citation:
Bhattacharjee S., Gopal R. D., Mardsen J. R., Sankaranarayanan, R. Re-tuning the music industry—can they re-attain business resonance? Communications of the ACM 52. 6 (2009). 136–140.

How to Find the Citation

You can usually find the article you want by searching for the journal title in the CUNY Catalog.

Use the Title begins with… search to search for the journal title. In this case, that is Communications of the ACM. Individual articles are not included in the CUNY Catalog, but journals are.

Once you find the correct journal title, click on the word Queens to find the holdings information; that is, the dates and volumes we have available.

In some cases, we might have a journal in multiple formats: print, electronic or microform. This will be indicated on the record.

If we have the journal in print or microform, you can find out whether we have the correct year. In this case, we have Communications of the ACM in microfiche from volumes 1 and 2, that is, 1958–1959. We have many more issues in print, from volume 3, which was published in 1960, through volume 43, which was published in 2000.

If we have it electronically, there will be a link, often reading Queens College. Click on it.

You can also search for Electronic Journals directly using "Find E-Journals" in Quick Links or "Research" and "Electronic Journals"

 

You can search by Title or by ISSN, if you know it

You will get a results page like this

You will see a list of sources that make that journal available and the dates for each. In this case, Business Source Complete has this journal from 1999 to the present, so it would have the article we are looking for, which was published in 2009.

If we click on the name of the database we will see a list of volumes and issues, from which we can select the one that we want (in this case, volume 52 and issue 6). Then we will be able to find the article.

In some cases, there will be many journals that have a similar name. Nature is a good example. In such cases, instead of going through the CUNY Catalog it is often easier to use the Find E-Journals link from the home page. Once you have located a journal the process is the same. Note that this approach will not help you find any print issues of a journal we may have.